Facebook plans to implement algorithms that limits the virality of political posts

Why it matters?

Facebook is set to deploy more rigid algorithmic tools to limit the spread of viral content on its platform. This is according to a new report by the Wall Street Journal that highlights measures that have been tested in recent elections, including in Sri Lanka and Myanmar, to mitigate disinformation campaigns.

The move is in preparation for the November U.S. presidential election, which is set to pose some unique challenges. The company believes that there’s tremendous potential for upheaval spurred on by the spread of disinformation during election season.

According to a recent blog post by Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, the country is deeply divided along political lines. Zuckerberg has raised concerns about the recent surge in politically-motivated acts of violence as well as misinformed statements by public figures. He has alluded to these as indicators that democracy could be undermined if information is not regulated.

The following is the statement issued by Andy Stone, the company’s Policy Communications Director, in relation to this. “While I will intentionally not link to the New York Post, I want be clear that this story is eligible to be fact checked by Facebook’s third-party fact checking partners. In the meantime, we are reducing its distribution on our platform.” Facebook currently relies on a network of third-party fact-checking organizations to authenticate such information. They include the Associated Press, the Daily Caller, and France-Presse.


Dutch Coronavirus contact apphas been pushed backed until at least mid-October

The Dutch government-backed app which warns people if they come in contact with possible coronavirus patients will not be launched nationwide until mid-October at the earliest, broadcaster NOS said on Thursday.

This is because the legislation needed to anchor the app has not yet completed its passage through parliament, the broadcaster said.

The upper house of parliament will not vote on the legislation until October 6 at the earliest, but this could be delayed if senators have a lot of questions. Even if senators can pass the law on October 6, it will still take a week to finalize the legal paperwork and roll out a publicity campaign, a health ministry spokesman said. The app has been available for download since mid-August and is currently supported by five regional health boards.


Google is creating a microscope with AI and AR to help detect cancer

Google has won a contract with the Defense Innovation Unit (DIU) to use recent technological advancements to improve the accuracy of a cancer diagnosis. About five percent of diagnoses are made incorrectly, and in half of those cases, the incorrect diagnosis causes problems further down the road.

Google plans to train an AI using the open-source platform TensorFlow to detect cancerous cells in photos taken from a microscope. They’ve already started developing the neural networks by using the Google Cloud Healthcare API to de-identify and segment existing datasets. Once the AI is fully trained, they’ll design their own microscope with an integrated AR (augmented reality) overlay that shows physicians' information about the likelihood of cells being cancerous.

To effectively treat cancer, speed and accuracy are critical,” said Mike Daniels, vice president of Google Cloud’s department for the Global Public Sector. “We are partnering with the DIU to provide our machine learning and artificial intelligence technology to help frontline healthcare practitioners learn about capabilities that can improve the lives of our military men and women and their families.

Google hopes that their method will reduce the “overwhelming volume of data” physicians face and will make the diagnoses faster and cheaper, as well as being more accurate. But widespread use of AI in medical practices is still a while away. The first shipment of microscopes will be to select the Defense Health Agency treatment facilities for research only. Afterward, the technology will roll out to the broader US Military Health System and Veteran’s Affairs hospitals for real-world trialing.

 


Google and Apple release contact tracing app API to public health agencies accross the globe

Google and Apple delivered their contact tracing app API to public health agencies across the globe. The apps would allow Bluetooth pings between smartphones within six and a half feet of each other. And in theory, these apps would notify you if you had been in close contact with someone diagnosed with COVID-19. In practice, public health authorities will have to encourage around 60% of people in a given state or country to download the app in order to meaningfully conduct contact tracing/exposure notification. Computerworld executive editor Ken Mingis and PCWorld/Macworld’s Michael Simon join Juliet to discuss Apple and Google’s unprecedented collaboration, privacy concerns, and how state and federal governments will utilize the API.

You can listen to this podcast episode right now clicking on this link. And you can subscribe to this podcast series from your favorite podcast app on your mobile device to listen to any time, so you won't miss an episode. Just click the desired podcast app's button below to subscribe.


Affordable Home Security System Best Arlo and Blink

After the much-publicized hacking of Amazon`s Ring security cameras in December that allowed strangers to peer into homes and harass occupants, Arlo and Blink camera systems have been notified recently of required changes to their accounts meant to enhance security.

Arlo users are now required to turn on two-factor authentication by the end of the year (2020), while Amazon`s Blink is still taking baby steps in implementing the two-factor authentication. The 2FA has been an option to be activated since last year, however, a message has been sent to owners that it will be compulsory to enable it before the end of 2020. The 2FA can be verified via a push notification to a previously trusted device, through SMS messages, and emails.

Owners of low-cost, battery-powered Blink cameras have received emails informing them about 2FA been on the way and the owners had to verify their email addresses starting on March 30th.


Computer Hacking and How To Protect It

Individuals using a device connected to the Internet are vulnerable to the threats posed by cyber predators and computer hackers. Such computer hacking experts typically use phishing scams, instant messages or spam emails and fake websites to deliver dangerous malware to your computer and compromise your computer security.

If you are not secured by a firewall, these hackers may also try to access your device and private information directly. You will be able to monitor your messages, review the back-end of your personal website, and also install malware. Protecting your device from hackers is, therefore, a growing concern that can be solved by installing effective antivirus software and other virus protection measures.

Hackers can do the following things with your computer:

  • Make purchases
  • Hijack your passwords and usernames
  • Obtain cash advances
  • Ruin your credit
  • Request new account Personal Identification Numbers (PINSs) or additional credits
  • Add themselves or an alias that they control as an authorized user so it is easier to use your credit.

Tips on how to stay protected from computer hacking activities

Install, update and use antivirus

Installing antivirus software is an extremely important step that helps to protect viruses and avoid malware, but it doesn't affect everyone.

Turn on the windows firewall

Windows has a built-in firewall that protects your PC from unwanted internet attention. This software firewall is enabled by default and works alongside any hardware firewall that is installed into your home broadband router. Check its settings by entering "Test Firewall" in the Start menu search box and selecting Check Firewall status from the list. Three green tick marks mean that the firewall is usually operating, if not, choosing each one to turn the firewall on.

Check link locations

Unknown messages are connected to unknown pages. You could end up facing unintended consequences if you visit a cryptic website. Such pages may be unsecured or compromised with malware. Copy and paste the connection location to a new browser to see which site is on the other side. Encrypted pages are the easiest to visit because you know they are safe when you see HTTPS in the URL and the lock icon on your browser.

Use Advanced Password

An effective password includes lowercase, uppercase, punctuation, numbers, and special characters. Do not store a list in a saved file and refrain from making a personal reference to the password. Never use the same password on multiple accounts.

Use Two-Factor Authentication

When hackers get your passwords, they try to study which personal accounts they can control with the stolen data. Two-factor authentication is known to be an effective way to stop attackers who have stolen passwords. A growing number of companies are now setting standards for logging in. For two-factor authentication, users will need to enter a password and also validate an entry with another element like a code that is sent to the phone.

Be Suspicious of Emails

If you receive phone emails, make sure to check your email address to see if it suits the website you think it is from. You can also search the sender's IP address in order to be extra careful. This can be done by identifying the source information from the email and then searching for an IP address that matches the' Received: from' line. Google will have an IP address to discover the source of the email.

Use The Most Recent Version of Your Web Browser

Web browsers are vital tools, but they can contain bugs just like other apps. Hackers are fast to capitalize on these and create false websites with data designed to exploit them. After hacking the web browser in this way, the hacker will be able to monitor anything you type, from credit card numbers to passwords. It is therefore important for you to use the most recent version of your web browser, as this helps prevent hacking attempts by your computer and other related issues.

 


SPOTLIGHT ON SOFTWARE TECHNOLOGY: DOCKER

Introducing Docker the modern solution for all developers with deployment problems in applications.

Docker essentially use a container system that separate one’s application with the infrastructure its build on. By offering this, docker system not only increases the portability of the system but also reduces any environmental issues caused when deploying an application. It also helps duplicate and widen the scope of application across multiple servers.

Dockers will save your day by:

  • Accelerating developer on-boarding, setting up a complex developer system within a few mins.
  • Eliminating any app conflicts, because Dockers have so many containers it helps multiple versions exist side by side. Also, it’s easy to start and stop applications with Docker commands.
  • Docker helps you run containers in multiple environments. Therefore, the software shipping is made easier, which can also include being able to ship the infrastructure and software.

Now what are you waiting for? Dive in and get acquainted.

You’ll soon realise just how much Docker can improve your software development and application deployment.

To find out more about Dockers check https://www.docker.com

And if you want to find out about the best suited hardware for your software check https://easyhardwaretrading.com

 

 

 


The Biggest Technology Trends in 2020 To Get Ready For

We are amid the 4th Industrial Revolution, and technology is evolving faster than ever before. Companies and individuals who do not keep up with some of the major trends in technology run the risk of being left behind. Understanding key trends will allow people and businesses to prepare for and take advantage of opportunities. As a future-oriented business and technology, it is my job to look ahead and identify the most important trends. In this article, I share with you the seven most imminent trends that everyone should be ready for in 2020.

AI-as-a-service

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is one of the most transformative technological developments of our time. Most companies have begun to explore how they can use AI to improve their customer experience and streamline their business operations. This will continue in 2020 and, as people become increasingly used to working alongside AIs, the design and deployment of our AI-based systems will remain an expensive proposition for most businesses.

Currently, these platforms, provided by the likes of Amazon, Google, and Microsoft, tend to be somewhat broad in scope, with (often expensive) custom-engineering required to apply them to the specific tasks an organization may require. During 2020, we will see wider adoption and a growing pool of providers that are likely to start offering more tailored applications and services for specific or specialized tasks. This will mean no company will have any excuses left not to use AI.


Apple releasing trio of 5G iPhones in 2020

The target of the iPhone maker is to ship at least 80 million of the new 5G iPhone models in a bid to overtake embattled Chinese tech giant Huawei, CNET reports.

CALIFORNIA: Apple is rumored to be preparing its first 5 G iPhone for next year, and according to the latest Nikkei report, a modem for the upcoming model will be designed by Qualcomm. Apple is likely to launch three iPhone 5G-enabled models in 2020. The aim of the iPhone manufacturer is to ship at least 80 million new 5 G iPhone models in a bid to overwhelm Chinese tech giant Huawei, CNET reports.

The purported 5 G iPhone models are said to use the Qualcomm X55 modem chips. It was speculated earlier that Apple would have its own modem chips for its iPhone lineup in 2021.


Cybersecurity Awareness: Secure IT, Own IT, Protect IT

For all companies, cybersecurity should be a problem— big and small. In our increasingly linked globe, cybersecurity should also be a problem for customers, government agencies, and basically anyone who depends on the Internet. To quote two high-profile instances of mass cybercrime, in 2016 some 3 billion Yahoo accounts were hacked, and in 2017 412 million Friendfinder accounts were damaged, according to Varonis, a cybersecurity study firm.

A malware attack's average price was US$ 2.4 million, while the price in lost moment averaged 50 days, the company discovered. Even more worrisome, the average price of worldwide cybercrime risen by 27 percent in 2017, with ransomware expenses that year exceeding $5 billion— fifteen times the cost of ransomware just two years earlier. The issue is that the threats are still ignored by far too many individuals. "Yes, we certainly should always think about cybersecurity," said Elad Shapria, head of studies at the Panorays cybersecurity company.

Building Awareness

Luckily, attempts are being made to concentrate on the threat in the hope that knowing really is half the fight. In October, which is the National Cyber Security Awareness Month, or NCSAM, a focus will shine on many of those initiatives. The Department of Homeland Security's National Cyber Security Division and the Nonprofit National Cyber Security Alliance joined in designating the month as a means of raising awareness of the significance of cybersecurity.

As part of a wide attempt to educate Americans and assist them to remain safe and secure online, NCSAM first introduced in 2004. Initial attempts claimed easy stuff that could be done by individuals, such as maintaining antivirus programs up to date. The objective was to remind customers in October to do cybersecurity updates— comparable to remembering changing batteries in a smoke detector when they put their clocks back in the fall or spring forward. "It grew out of NCSA's previous awareness attempts working in partnership with sector and government," said NCSA Executive Director Kelvin Coleman.

The attempts have extended in more latest years, and since 2009 the month has included the general theme, "Our Shared Responsibility," reflecting how everyone— from big businesses to individual computer users— plays a part in securing digital assets. "We want individuals to know the shared accountability of cybersecurity because what we do online can impact others," Coleman informed TechNewsWorld. "When that worker opens a poor connection to their office email, it could have broader corporate repercussions and put everyone at danger," he added. "We discovered that this continuing outreach to different target audiences works really well," Coleman said. "In addition to exchanging data with the press, we disseminate products and resources through our partners representing industry, government, tiny and medium-sized enterprises, and academia, thus spreading our message across multiple channels and reaching a broad group."

Increasing Awareness

NCSAM's overarching message for 2019 is "Own IT. Secure IT. Protect IT." This year's objective is to concentrate on important fields of citizen privacy, consumer devices, and the safety of e-commerce. "It's essential to call times like the National Cybersecurity Awareness Month to remember what we're facing and how we can be vigilant," said Shapria of Panorays. "One major issue is that we continue to see catastrophic information breaches by third parties," he observed. These attacks can often happen when hackers target suppliers with the objective of accessing information from big businesses with which the suppliers are related or otherwise working. "We saw this occur with Wipro, Evite, and AMCA this year— and such cyber incidents can lead to a loss of consumer confidence and allegiance, expensive regulatory penalties for businesses, and even bankruptcy," advised Shapria.

What should not be part of the solution is the assumption that the threat is understood by staff at any stage. All too often, this can lead to lax behaviors of safety. "What is evident is generally subjective. Businesses need to acknowledge that staff knowledge and training on cybersecurity threats is an important component of how they can mitigate the inadvertent or intentional violation of employees," said Justin Fox, DevOps engineering director at NuData Security, a Mastercard corporation.

"Employees need to be educated on what safety warnings they should care about are lawful warnings, as opposed to advertisements that look like a warning," he informed TechNewsWorld. "Employees need to know how their security protocols have been enforced and[ trained] in some of the most popular emails they can obtain from safety software," added Fox. "Then they will probably know how to properly react to threats."

Shared Data, Shared Responsibility

Data sharing on a daily basis has complex cybersecurity issues. Besides worrying about protecting their own information, everybody now has to trust every business, seller, customer, employer, and worker to safeguard their information as well. "Businesses need to be conscious that when hiring and sharing information with suppliers, the risk of being infringed by those suppliers is significantly increased," suggested Shapria from Panorays.

Companies need to carefully evaluate and track the cyber posture of their suppliers with the same diligence they are monitoring their own pcs, networks and systems. Simply put, the severity of the continuing threat must be recognized by everyone. "Consumers need to be conscious so that they can comprehend with their information what businesses are doing and request greater controls," Shapria said. "C-level execs need to be conscious as safety impacts the price of doing company directly, while staff needs to be conscious so that they do not expose their businesses to cyber danger," he added. "Developers need to be conscious to be able to program safe alternatives, and network administrators need to be conscious to be able to protect their businesses and client information."

Failure to Act

The cost of failing to heed warnings can be huge— not just in bucks, but in wasted time, lost productivity, and even the social stigma that may accompany hacks. Cities like Baltimore and Atlanta, businesses like Target and Yahoo, and even government agencies like the Personnel Management Office had to react to major cyber attacks. The danger is becoming so bad that the Internet, which has become the glue that holds the connected world together, may fail to the extent that it can not be trusted.

"Who will want to use[ the Internet] if all of your documents are open fodder and can be accessed so readily by hackers?" Daniel M. Gerstein, Ph.D., senior policy scientist at RAND Corporation, commented. "If we can not get our act together and solve this problem properly, the present Internet could eventually become little more than a straightforward data-sharing platform," he said to TechNewsWorld. The Internet may not go away, but if the information is not safe, there may be a future when relying solely on streaming Netflix and watching Wikipedia facts. That situation may seem extreme, but from a breaking point, the Web could be just one significant violation. "We need to be serious about safety and there are methods to safeguard it, but right now, on the data superhighway, the ordinary customer could basically become roadkill," Gerstein advised. There is hope that constant attempts to raise awareness will be worthwhile.

"We discovered that this continuing outreach to different target audiences works really well," Coleman said of NCSA. "In addition to exchanging data with the press, we disseminate products and resources through our partners representing the sector, government, SMBs, and academia, thus spreading our message across different channels and reaching a broad group."