Apple's MagSafe Battery review

In this review of the MagSafe Charger, you can read whether this magnetic charger is for you. How handy is it and is the MagSafe charger worth the money? We discuss the pros and cons with our experiences with the MagSafe charger.

I'm sure I speak for all Apple fans when I say I was looking forward to the AirPower, Apple's first wireless charger. The AirPower wasn't just a typical wireless charger with an Apple logo, as Apple frequently does. It has to accomplish something remarkable, such as charge your iPhone and other devices without issue and with accurate placement. However, the proposal proved to be a little too forward, and the AirPower never materialized. That is not to say that Apple has been idle, as we now have a new wireless charger from the company. The MagSafe Charger is especially for the iPhone 12series and has the main twist the magnetic attachment. Is the MagSafe Charger a must-have? Or is it better to ignore the new charger? In this review of the MagSafe Charger, we provide the answer.

MagSafe Charger review: in short

These are the main features of the Mag Safe Charger

  1. Easy to attach to the back
  2. The magnetic wireless charger is available for iPhone 12 models and higher.
  3. Can Charge with up to 15 w
  4. Available from 45 euros
  5. Round disc with aluminum housing.

For this MagSafe Charger review, we tested the regular charger. Apple also comes with the MagSafe Duo Charger, a combination between the MagSafe charger and an Apple Watch dock. This model is expected to be available later this year for an unknown price.


Apple have done the coolest drag and drop demo ever

Apple debuted its latest macOS version today at the Worldwide Developers Conference, along with a feature dubbed Universal Control, which allows you to use your Mac's mouse or trackpad to control the cursor on an iPad or another Mac's screen, reaching into and across many devices. On the surface, it may not appear to be revolutionary, but Craig Federighi did something pretty remarkable during the demo: he moved his cursor onto an iPad, then clicked on a photo and dragged it across two other machines to place it into a Final Cut timeline.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3PcKvaW5jzw

While Logitech's Flow and programs like Synergy have also enabled users to easily switch between PCs, it's not always as remarkable in practice - some solutions require specific hardware, some don't support true dragging and dropping, and still, others have cumbersome configurations. Apple's version appears to be flawless.

It is worth noting that, according to Apple’s site, there are a few small caveats for Universal Control — it will only work with three devices (so Apple was showing its full capabilities in this demo), and it won’t work on every device getting the new versions of macOS and iPadOS.

Here’s the list of Macs that can initiate Universal Control:

  • MacBook Pro (2016 and later)
  • MacBook (2016 and later)
  • MacBook Air (2018 and later)
  • iMac (2017 and later)
  • iMac (5K Retina 27-inch, Late 2015)
  • Mac mini (2018 and later)
  • iMac Pro
  • Mac Pro 2019

As for iPads, it’ll work with:

  • iPad Pro
  • iPad Air (3rd generation and later)
  • iPad (6th generation and later)
  • iPad mini (5th generation and later)

While the function works with iPads, it must be activated on the Mac – thus if you were hoping to transfer a file to your Mac using an Apple Pencil or your finger, you're out of luck (as fun as that sounds).

Apple claims that the function requires no setup (other than having your two devices logged in with the same Apple ID and Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, and Handoff turned on), but we won't know how fast and reliable it is until we test it. Will it work every time you place your iPad next to your iMac, or will you be tapping your fingers on the desk waiting for them to understand they should be communicating?

Obviously, we'll have to wait and see how Universal Control works in practice, but the demo makes it appear as though everything just works - Federighi moved the machines close to one other and could switch between keyboards, mice, and screens. It makes for a great demo, hinting at the everlasting goal of computing: being able to use all of your gadgets together, regardless of form factor or operating system (though, of course, this version of the dream ignores non-Apple devices).


Apple set to debut a foldable iPhone in 2023

For Apple, the question isn't "if" they'll create a foldable, but "when." We've been hearing talk about it since at least 2017, but nothing has come to fruition yet. And, in fact, it's usually best to stand back and let others go first, so they can see what works and what doesn't in the real world.

According to a respected industrial analyst, Ming-Chi Kuo, Apple is expected to launch a folding iPhone with 8-inch QHD+ flexible OLED display in 2023.

Kuo told investors that he reached that conclusion based on his new industry survey in a recent note from MacRumors. SDC will function as the sole display provider "and the sole DDI fundry provider is Samsung Foundry," added Kuo.

The analyst anticipates that Apple will embrace the silver nanowire contact solution for TPK due to its advantages over Y-Octa technology for SDC.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OesVttlQVF8&t=91s

Kuo believes that the company aims in 2023 to ship between 15 and 20 million foldable iPhones based on Apple's requested capacity. He predicts more folding components are going to be a must and help build the next major upgrade super cycle.

The new crop of folding smartphones doesn't trick to blur the distinctions between smartphone and tablet, as Kuo correctly points out. They are also a little tough around the edges because manufacturers still deal with design and durability problems. However, Kuo finally sees flippables as devices that combine the mobile, tablet and laptop components into a single computer more seamlessly.

 

 


A 64-core Mac Pro priced at €16,000+ is rumored to arrive next year.

The speculation comes from @LeaksApplePro, which says that at least three Mac Pro configurations will arrive next year, featuring Arm-based SoCs that mix performance and efficiency cores, much like the M1. The rumored flagship comes with a monstrous 64 CPU cores (48 of which will be powered), 512GB of RAM, 128 GPU cores, and starts at €16,000

 

Sixteen grand is a lot of money, but the Mac Pro is usual. You could spend more than $50,000 on a top-spec Xeon powered current model, and that's without the $5,000+ Pro Display XDR and $700 wheels.

The middle configuration includes 48 CPU cores (36 performance), 256GB of RAM, 64 GPU cores, and starts at $12,000. Meanwhile, the cheapest choice is 32 core CPUs (24 performance), 64GB RAM, and 32 core GPUs. It starts at $5,499, which is around $100 less than the new Mac Pro base model.

Apple has spent years trying to reduce its dependence on Intel, and with the popularity of the M1, we can definitely expect its in-house chips to start appearing soon enough on more Macs; that's partly why the iMac Pro has been discontinued. But the specs here are supposed to be taken with a large grain of salt. One Twitter user noted that a 64-core Mac Pro desktop is unlikely to need 16 efficiency cores, adding that all versions are likely to feature only four or eight of these low-power cores.


It is reported that Apple might not be ditching the Touch Bar after all

Renowned Apple analyst Ming-Chi Kuo predicted last month that starting with 2021 models, MacBook Pros would lose the widely criticized Touch Bar functionality. Apple is said to be using extra internal real estate to add more ports. But it seems that Cupertino might not be absolutely loving the Touch Bar.

Patently, Apple has discovered more than 70 patents recently issued to Apple by the US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). Among these were two reconfigurations (patent #10,921,854) of the MacBook Pro Touch Bar that engineers could consider. The two redesigns place the Touch Bar closer to the screen than the keyboard. The first one (Fig. 6) shows it approximately in the same position (maybe slightly higher) as the latest Touch Bar versions. However, it incorporates a second monitor in a more prominent position right under the screen.

As well, patents are never promises of potential functionality. Apple may just want to defend itself from rivals coming up with a better understanding of its technology. As a general rule, I prefer to give more validity to Kuo's predictions of upcoming Apple devices than to Apple's patents.

 

 

 


Apple's App Tracking Transparency feature to be enabled by default and will arrive in 'early spring' on ios

In iOS 14, Apple shared a few more details about its much-discussed improvements to privacy. At WWDC in June, the company first revealed that software developers would have to ask users for permission for cross-property ad targeting purposes to track and share their IDFA identifier. Apple postponed the monitoring restrictions until 2021, saying it wanted to give developers more time to make the required improvements, while iOS 14 was released in the fall.

We have a slightly-more-specific timeline now. In early spring, the intention is to introduce these updates, with a version of the feature arriving in the next iOS 14 beta update.

"This is how the new system is described by Apple: "Users will be able to see under Settings which apps have requested permission to monitor and make changes as they see fit. With the forthcoming release of iOS 14, iPadOS 14, and tvOS 14, this requirement will roll out widely in early spring and has already gained support from privacy advocates around the world.

And here are the basics of what you need to know:

  • The App Tracking Transparency feature moves from the old method where you had to opt-out of sharing your Identifier for Advertisers (IDFA) to an opt-in model. This means that every app will have to ask you upfront whether it is ok for them to share your IDFA with third parties including networks or data brokers.
  • The feature’s most prominent evidence is a notification on the launch of a new app that will explain what the tracker will be used for and ask you to opt-in to it.
  • You can now toggle IDFA sharing on a by-app basis at any time, where previously it was a single toggle. If you turn off the “Allow apps to request to track” setting altogether no apps can even ask you to use tracking.
  • Apple will enforce this for all third-party data sources including data sharing agreements, but of course, platforms can still use first-party data for advertising as per their terms of service.
  • Apple expects developers to understand whether APIs or SDKs that they use in their apps are serving user data up to brokers or other networks and to enable the notification if so.
  • Apple will abide by the rules for its own apps as well and will present the dialog and follow the ‘allow apps to request’ toggle if its apps use tracking (most do not at this point).
  • One important note here is that the Personalized Ads toggle is a separate setting that specifically allows or does not allow Apple itself to use its own first-party data to serve you ads. So that is an additional layer of opt-out that affects Apple data only.

Apple is now growing its Ad attribution API capabilities, enabling better click measurement, video conversion measurement, and also, for some instances, app-to-web conversions, and this is a major one.

This news comes on Data Privacy Day, with CEO Tim Cook speaking at the Computers, Privacy, and Data Protection conference in Brussels this morning about the problem. A recent study showing that the average app has six third-party trackers is also being shared by the company.

Although this seems like a welcome move from a privacy perspective, some criticism has been drawn from the advertising industry, with Facebook launching a PR campaign highlighting the effect on small businesses, while also referring to the shift as "one of the most important headwinds of advertising" it might face this year. The position of Apple is that it has a user-centric approach to data protection, rather than an advertiser-centric one.


Apple and Samsung smartwatches could feature non-invasive blood glucose monitoring

Conditions that affect this writer, such as type 1 diabetes, require blood glucose levels to be checked many times every day. Usually, it involves pricking a finger with a lancet and putting a drop of blood in a glucose meter, a process that causes marks, hardens the skin and can be awkward.

Alternatively, glucose monitors are constant (CGMs). A flexible, wire-like needle that is fired into the skin is contained in these small devices. They stay on a carrier for about 10 days, sending blood glucose data every few minutes to a smartphone or smartwatch. When their blood glucose levels go dangerously low or high, while being much more convenient than finger pricking, CGMs are able to warn diabetics. But the need for them to be replaced several times a month means that they are expensive. Also, CGMs are easy to knock off the skin, can be very itchy, and can bleed sometimes.

Korean media claim that both Samsung and Apple's next smartwatches will feature optical glucose monitors, which work to continuously measure levels by shining a light through the skin. Apple reportedly hired a team of biomechanical engineers to work on the feature in 2017, while Samsung last year developed a method of glucose monitoring called Raman spectroscopy that uses lasers to identify chemical compositions.

These features sound amazing on a personal level, but their appeal to diabetics will depend on the accuracy. Even invasive CGMs, which measure the glucose in the fluid surrounding the cells of a body, called interstitial fluid, are not always 100% correct, so it is difficult to imagine an optical sensor being as precise as finger pricking, but hopefully here.

It is expected that the Apple Watch 7 and subsequent Galaxy smartwatches will arrive later this year.